Cashews and Your Health

Cashews and Your Health

Nuts have been a part of our diets since the time of hunters and gatherers. What may have seemed like an easy, edible food item to find in many areas, also served another purpose: keeping people healthy. Cashews in particular are extremely dense in nutrition and can play an integral part of any diet. They are packed with a variety of vitamins and minerals, all which help the body to stay healthy and live long. In addition, they have a wonderful, unique taste.

The B Vitamin Bonus

B Vitamins have long been associated with mental health and overall mood. According to the Mayo Clinic, low levels of B Vitamins can be linked with depression. (Hall-Flavin, M.D.) While it’s true you can take a B Vitamin supplement, many doctors and scientist agree the most beneficial way of getting B Vitamins into the diet is with food. And what better way than with tasty, organic cashews? They contain B-1 (thiamine), B-5 (riboflavin), and B-6 (pyridoxine), and that’s just the start.

Mineral Density

In addition to a variety of B vitamins, cashews contain minerals such as: manganese, potassium, copper, iron, magnesium, and even zinc. Your body needs all of these minerals to function properly and carry out important tasks. So while you might have always thought of cashews as tasty little treats, they are almost like miniature vitamin and mineral pills, without the chalky taste. Eating them daily can give your body important nutrients it needs while giving it the taste it desires.

Lower Your Chance of Getting Chronic Diseases

 As we age, it’s only normal for our bodies to begin to break down. This can be due to many factors, including: poor diet, lack of exercise, lack of proper nutrients, exposure to toxins, and even genetics. So when you look at the many ways we can get sick, it only makes sense to fight off those diseases before we become susceptible to them. The sooner your body gets important vitamins and minerals, the easier it is to fight off illness and disease.

The New England Journal of Medicine recently wrote a report citing the benefits of eating nuts. They state, “Increased nut consumption has been associated with a reduced risk of major chronic diseases, including cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus.” (Bao) Type 2 diabetes mellitus is generally caused by poor diet and lack of exercise.

Studies have shown cashews can decrease bad cholesterol while also reducing the risk of heart disease. It’s easy to add cashews to any diet to help prevent issues later on in life.

Fast Food No More

 It’s no secret that our society is geared towards having things fast. We want them and we want them now. When it comes to food, however, we are doing ourselves an injustice with fast food. Is it convenient? Of course – but at what price?

If you’re trying to get away from the fast food cycle, all it takes is a little preparation, and there is no easier way than with cashews. If you’re looking for a quick snack to hold you over or you need a little pick me up, cashews can do the trick without any excess calories, sugar, or fat you find in most fast foods. They are also convenient to carry in your purse or car, for anytime you need a boost and don’t have time for a traditional meal.

The Right Nut

While all nuts are beneficial in some way, cashews are packed with what your body needs. Their wonderful taste, coupled with their amazing health benefits make them the perfect food choice. With them being so easy to take with you anywhere you go, it makes perfect sense to add them to your daily diet. A tasty, healthy, easy to carry treat, what more could you ask for?

References

Hall-Flavin, M.D., Daniel. “What’s the relationship between vitamin B-12 and Depression?.” Mayo Clinic. The Mayo Clinic, 06 Feb 2014. Web. 25 Mar 2014. <http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/depression/expert-answers/vitamin-b12-and-depression/faq-20058077>.

Bao, Ying. “Association of Nut Consumption with Total and Cause-Specific Mortality.” The New England Journal of Medicine. The New England Journal of Medicine, 21 Nov 2013. Web. 25 Mar 2014. <http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa1307352>.