Cashews and Cancer Prevention

Cashews and Cancer Prevention: A Positive Outlook

 Cashews have long been known to have numerous vitamins and minerals the body needs. While this is beneficial to anyone’s health, there is even more potentially great news about cashews. Studies are showing that beta sitosterol, which is found in the nut, may contain cancer fighting abilities.

Scientists have known for years that a plant based diet, including cashews, is a great way to help prevent cancer. Now, studies are showing that beta sitosterol may just be the perfect thing for cancer patients and those who want to avoid cancer to begin with. According to a study done, “They have been shown experimentally to inhibit colon and breast cancer development. They act at various stages of tumor development, including inhibition of tumorigenesis, inhibition of tumor promotion, and induction of cell differentiation. They effectively inhibit invasion of tumor cells and metastasis. With regard to toxicity, no obvious side effects of phytosterols have been observed in studies to date, with the exception of individuals with phytosterolemia.” (Ovesna) What this study suggests is that cashews can help to fight two of the most common cancers we are seeing in today’s society.

So not only do cashews taste great, but they are loaded with vitamins and minerals the body needs, and also beta sitosterol which has been shown in studies to help prevent cancer. According to the American Cancer Society, “the chances of a woman having invasive breast cancer during her life is about 1 in 8.” (American Cancer Society) Breast cancer is the second leading cancer which causes death in women.

Colorectal (Colon) cancer, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, “is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States and the third most common cancer in men and in women.” (“Colorectal (Colon) Cancer”) So if beta sitosterol can help to fight cancer, it makes perfect sense to add cashews which contain it, into the diet.

How Beta Sitosterol Works

 Scientists have found that best sitosterol works by helping to reduce LDL cholesterol levels because it prevents the body from absorbing too much of it. It has also been found to join to the prostate which helps to alleviate inflammation which can cause men to have difficulty urinating (due to an enlarged prostate).

Other Benefits of Beta Sitosterol

 Beta sitosterol is also used for numerous common ailments. It has been prescribed for heart disease and also high cholesterol. It has the ability to give the immune system a boost to help prevent the common cold and the flu, and it’s also beneficial for  rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, allergies, asthma, and even hair loss.

As new evidence comes out about the benefits of beta sitosterol, we can likely expect more studies to emerge. There may be additional diseases and ailments it fights which we don’t even know about yet.

An Easy Way to Prevent Disease

 While it may not always be easy to completely change your diet, there are little things you can do to help every day. Eating organic cashews can help to fight off diseases which are common, and help to increase health. Since they’re packed with vitamins and minerals, and the ever impressive beta sitosterol, they’re a great idea for a daily snack. These convenient, great tasting nuts are easy to incorporate into diet – all you need to do is twist off the cap to one of our convenient jars.

References

Ovesna, Z. “Taraxasterol and beta-sitostero: new naturally compounds with chemoprotective/chemopreventative effects..” Pub Med. US National Library of Medicine and National Institutes of Health, n.d. Web. 27 Mar 2014. <http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15640948>.

 “How Many Women Get Breast Cancer?.” The American Cancer Society. The American Cancer Society, 31 Jan 2014. Web. 27 Mar 2014. <http://www.cancer.org/cancer/breastcancer/overviewguide/breast-cancer-overview-key-statistics>.

“Colorectal (Colon) Cancer.” Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 23 Oct 2013. Web. 27 Mar 2014. <http://www.cdc.gov/cancer/colorectal/statistics/>.